My name is Kurt Hofmann, and I’m a Constitution worshipper

Boy was I confused–so ignorant, so backward, that I thought reverence for the Constitution in general, and the Bill of Rights in particular, was to be commended. How fortunate I am to have Michael McGough, of the Los Angeles Times, to set me straight.

It turns out that it’s attitudes like mine that get in the way of treating the Constitution like the “living, breathing document” we are now told that it is, so that we can have our rights legislated away (which, apparently, is what we want–or should want, if we weren’t so stubbornly stuck on this silly obsession with “rights”). I need to find out if there’s some kind of support group for people like me–a kind of Constitution Worshippers Anonymous, so I can get on board with the progressive idea of chopping up the Bill of Rights.

The reason this is necessary is that until Americans cease to be so touchy about the Bill of Rights, the Second Amendment isn’t going anywhere, and now that a growing body of legal scholarship acknowldges that the Second Amendment actually means what it says, the vision of an American gun-free Utopia is threatened. Obviously, we can’t have that.

It’s that pesky Constitutionally guaranteed fundamental human right of the individual to keep and bear arms, getting in the way again. There’s not much we can do to change the fact that it’s a fundamental human right–those are, by nature, unchangeable. What we can do–if we can only force Americans to realize how immoral they are to love their country, and the principles on which it was founded–is to get rid of the “Constitutionally guaranteed” part. Once the guarantee goes, the fact that it’s a fundamental human right can simply be ignored, and we’re well on our way to complete disarmament. A lovely vision, is it not?

So, where can I get my reverence for the Bill of Rights indoctrinated out of my psyche? Where can I go to learn to actively participate in my own subjugation? Where can I learn to long for abject servitude?

On second thought, I think I’ll just hold what I’ve got. I’m Kurt Hofmann, and I’m a Constitution worshipper, instead of a subversive traitor. Got a problem with that?

I’d like to thank We Are The Militia for the link and the kind words. By the way, I’ve finally enabled backlinks, which as far as I can tell, work like trackbacks, but so far, they don’t seem to be working very often, except for links withing Armed and Safe, from one blog post to another–still working on that.

Advertisements

9 Responses to “My name is Kurt Hofmann, and I’m a Constitution worshipper”

  1. straightarrow Says:

    Amen, brother. Just sent an email to LATimes asking if he was the best they could do?

  2. straightarrow Says:

    By the way, you are one sharp cookie.

    I don’t know the derivation of that particular phrase, but it applies despite the seeming illogic.

    how old are you? You seem to exhibit a young syntax, but used with a maturity of purpose not often seen.

  3. 45superman Says:

    Thanks, SA. I’d be interested in hearing about any response you get from them.

  4. 45superman Says:

    I was answering your first comment as you were writing your second, apparently.

    It really does mean a lot to me that you find what I write to be worth reading.

    Anyway, to answer your question, I’m 38–I’m not sure I agree with your assessment of my maturity (I think I manage a rather bizarre combination of immaturity and senility), but again, I’m much obliged for the kind words.

  5. BoonDoggie Says:

    “So, where can I get my reverence for the Bill of Rights indoctrinated out of my psyche? Where can I go to learn to actively participate in my own subjugation? Where can I learn to long for abject servitude?”

    That’s easy. Any university or high school will do.

  6. mack Says:

    Kurt, I am with you my friend. It’s far past the time that we Americans who believe the Constitution means what it says and say what it means and is not open to interpretation.

    What everyone in this country needs to understand is that all those sign carrying, protest joining, anti big government types back in the late 60’s and 70’s are now runnin gour government. A bunch of whiny, complaining, cry babies who still sleep with the light on as they are afraid of what may be hiding under the bed or in the closet. Wake up!

  7. opaww Says:

    Sorry for the long post

    The left wing and right wing anti-gunners are doubling there efforts to convince the American people that the Right to Keep and Bare Arms is not a right given to the common peoples, but rather a collective right for the Government.

    In their endeavor to deceive the American people on this issue, they have forgot or purposely left out vital information about our rights. We must go back in history and look closely at the time frame, our founding fathers, and the documents that we hold so dear.

    The unanimous Declaration of the thirteen united States of America,
    http://www.freespaces.com/opaww/Decloration.htm

    The Constitution of The United States
    http://www.freespaces.com/opaww/Constitution.htm

    The Bill of Rights
    http://www.freespaces.com/opaww/Bill.htm

    I post a link to the 3 main documents that were the backbone and or founding principles. They are as is written and not changed up by me or anyone else.

    Here is a link to my take on the Second Amendment that some of you have seen already but it applies just the same.
    http://www.freespaces.com/opaww/admin2.htm

    Note 1. A misleading term the anti gunners like to use when quoting the Second Amendment is milishia, instead of militia. Militia is the word used in the Second Amendment. Attempting to look up the meaning of milishia in the Webster’s Dictionary it tells me there is no such ward or meaning. But if we see how the gun grabbers use the ward we can place a gun grabbers value to it.
    The term milishia to the gun grabber is by their definition a military unit who member already belong to and are active participants. The definition I place on the word milishia is “a rogue body of citizens engaged in the act of legal or illegal armed confrontation, not sanctioned by the governing body, but called to arms by the peoples or the immediate need to act.”

    The assumption that some how the Second Amendment only applies to a military is a very misleading statement. If we look at the history of our great country we can see that this amendment applies to the citizenry as individuals and as a collective body. We must remember and actually separate the Bill of Rights from the Constitution in order to fully grasp the understanding of personal rights.

    The Constitution was ratified and became law September 17, 1787. The Bill of Rights was ratified December 15, 1791. Here is a historical account of the Constitution and Bill of Rights.
    http://www.archives.gov/national-archives-experience/charters/constitution_history.html

    The Constitution deals with the Governing body of the United States and not the individual rights of the citizens. This is one reason that the founding fathers had a long hard battle to ratify the document. A bargaining agreement was met to allow a Bill of Rights for the citizens to be wrote and become law.
    The bill of Rights was for every citizen in America and not the government. This document belongs to the people and not the elite. The first bill presented to the Congress had 12 Amendments to it, the first 2 being applied to Government were removed and the remaining 10 became our Bill of Rights.
    The Bill of Rights is Amendments to be added to our Constitution but as a separate document that dealt with personal right and not a governing body. Nowhere in the Constitution does it give the Government any rights to remove any of our rights, but they may enhance our right. (Add to, not take away) The first 10 were the core of our real freedoms as individual Americans.
    This alone shows proof that the Second Amendment applied to individuals who were citizens of America and not the military and/or the Government. Many of the founding fathers, wrote articles, letters, and books on the subject of our freedoms. In almost every one of them the Right of the individual citizen to keep and bare arms was paramount.

    Of the 13 colonies in America many wrote and ratified a type of Constitutions, and in what was to become a State Constitution they were very adamant about the individual rights to keep and bare arms. Here again we can see that the founding states of America understood the need for the individual to be armed at all times.
    With the oppression of the crown in America, many people resisted by arming themselves when they could. This was looked down on by whichever governor the crown placed in power and many people’s weapons were confiscated and powder, flint and shot were not issued them, from fear of reprisal by the populace.

    A second Item of the Bill of Rights is the term the People I cannot write a better response to this term then is already done here on this page.
    http://www.thefiringline.com/Misc/library/kates.html

    Let us not forget that for over 200 years we the peoples have believed the Second Amendment applied to us as citizens, and individuals. At no time has the Government stepped in and corrected this belief. In recent years though the anti gunners have tried to change the meanings and tell the peoples that they were wrong all along. The anti gunners also attempt to make the Bill of Rights a living document subject to change at the whim of an oppressive Governing body. It is not a living document, but rather a document that is absolute.
    One must remember that until the Bill of Rights was ratified and became law. No person had much of any rights that were an absolute. Even after the Bill of Rights was ratified woman and slaves had basically no right at all.

    When the Constitution was ratified and became law slaves were considered property by law. A person wishing to vote had to own property, (land or a slave.) Woman had no rights to property back then. With the defeat of slavery we now had another class of peoples who now qualified as citizens, with all the given rights that the Bill of Rights granted. Woman finely was granted their full rights also somewhere with in the 20th century.
    Just after the Civil War the anti gun movement started, with the intent of denying ex-slaves their rights to keep and bare arms. The anti gun movement has it’s roots in racism and not for the pretence of making America safer. Almost all quotes of violence are still directed toward the Black communities. When we see the news about violence and the need for gun control it has an ever-bearing presence of racism with in the statements. Here is an good article on the slavery and gun control issue.
    http://www.lewrockwell.com/poe/poe3.html

  8. hairy hobbit Says:

    are you saying that you follow the supreme law of the land?

    rather subversive these days eh comrade? After all we have international law, and global warming fruitcakes, and right is wrong and wrong is right things now, and do what you want if it feels good. Abiding by the constitution these days is just silly.

    now where’d I put my silly hat?

  9. opaww Says:

    The Constitution? I have heard of that some place. I think it is a town here in Kentucky, I think I’ll move there

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: